The Green Energy Industry

Chloe Foster, Online Editor

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Green Energy has been a controversial topic of discussion for quite awhile. The industry has grown, succeeded, and failed along the years, and despite the growing need for the industry, few companies are able to escape the trend of failing green energy companies.

This trend, of course, does not exhibit failure at first. At each company’s start, financial success seems imminent; investors are lining up, expansion is quick, and the road to green energy appears easy. But the costs of production and expansion quickly begin to outweigh income, and any profits made are soon lost. This is precisely what happened to companies like SunEdison, which expanded too quickly and in too many directions and ultimately ran out of money.

First Solar, a company established in 1999 yet recently reformed, aimed to avoid this failure, taking on the expansion process slowly and with caution. So far, this plan of action has been working for them; they’re considered a rarity in the money vacuum of green energy, actually being able to make $546 million on $3.6 billion revenue just last year.

These profits, however, could change drastically along with the industry itself with this upcoming election. With climate change and green energy being such a hot topic at the moment, the people expect politicians, whether they’re congressional representatives, statewide leaders, or federal executives, to take action (or to avoid taking action).

In the current presidential election, the two expected general candidates are Secretary Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump. These two candidates have drastically different viewpoints on climate change; Trump sees global warming as typical weather changes that don’t require legislative action, while Clinton plans to actively engage in the protection of the environment through green energy and a reduction of oil usage and energy waste. This means that they, along with congressmen who are influenced by the very people who will elect the president, will have to implement policies that align with the general public’s beliefs on climate change, as well as their own.

In such a crucial time for the environment, climate change and green energy investments are intrinsically connected with government, and will be just one more policy area heavily banking on the outcome of this election.

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